Crossing the Jordan: A Retelling with Blue Jello and Candy

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Joshua crossing the Jordan river lesson

After seeing this activity show up in my Pinterest feed used with the story of Moses Crossing the Red Sea, I knew I wanted to try it during our Vacation Bible school over Joshua for the story where the Israelites cross into the promised land by crossing the Jordan River on dry ground.  I didn’t want to give too much direction as to how to use the Jello and materials so I decided not to give the groups pictures of what I had seen on Pinterest.  Rather, I wanted to provide them with Scripture as reference as well as some illustrations of the story I found online and see what they came up with.

We had six different groups with different leaders helping the children ages preschool- 5th grade and it was fascinating to see how each of the groups interpreted the instructions differently.  Some of the children were very detailed in their depictions of the story, while some had fun sampling the materials.  The older children worked together in groups with some direction from their group leaders and the younger children were given a piece of the Jell-O so each child could “re-create” the story.

Using Blue Jello and candy, children recreated the story of the Israelites crossing the Jordan River
Using Blue Jello and candy, children recreated the story of the Israelites crossing the Jordan River
Learning and fun go together in this hands on retelling of the story of crossing the Jordan river
Learning and fun go together in this hands on retelling of the story of crossing the Jordan river

Even the little ones were able to get a taste of this activity with their own personal size version.

Preschool children were given a small piece of the Jello and were able to re-create the story of crossing the Jordan River
Preschool children were given a small piece of the Jello and were able to re-create the story of crossing the Jordan River

Even when the finished product didn’t look like what I had expected, the kids were excited about their work and could re-tell the story and explain what they had done in their creation.

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